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Archive for February 2011

In this week's East Asia Weekly Review, Mike Green discusses the DPJ's recent troubles at home and abroad.  This podcast is a service of the Asian Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

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What are the roots and branches of Yiddish and Ladino? What role have they played in Jewish history and how have they served as 'Jewish languages' in parallel but not identical ways? Two exceptional scholars, one in Yiddish and the other in Ladino, will share an extended conversation moderated by a linguist from Georgetown's faculty to address issues that carry from sound patterns and linguistic detail to cultural identity, and from gastronomy to Zionism and the question of what 'Jewish' has meant across history and across the world.

Hosted on February 24, 2011, at 6:00pm, this conversation on Ladino-Yiddish languages  featured Miriam Issacs and Judith Roumani and was moderated by Ori Soltes (Georgetown University).

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In this week's East Asia Weekly Review, Victor Cha discusses the ripple effects of the Egyptian protests in North Korea.  This podcast is a service of the Asian Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

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Americans and Israelis have often thought that their nations were chosen, in perpetuity, to do God's work. This belief in divine election is a potent, living force, one that has guided and shaped both peoples and nations throughout their history and continues to do so to this day. Through great adversity and despite serious challenges, Americans and Jews, leaders and followers, have repeatedly faced the world fortified by a sense that their nation has a providential destiny.

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In this week's East Asia Weekly Review, Victor Cha discusses the recent outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in North Korea.  This podcast is a service of the Asian Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

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Natasha Mozgovaya discusses the visibility and impact of newcomers  (Russians, Ethiopians, illegal immigrants and other minorities) in Israel's political arena, a topic she has been covering extensively in the media over the past months. An immigrant from the FSU herself, Natasha Mozgovaya explores how those groups have influenced Israel's decision-making process domestically and in the peace negotiations.

Mozgovaya immigrated to Israel from Russia at age 11, as part of the 'Big Aliyah' of the 1990s. She began writing for newspapers in Russian as a teenager, and by the age of 18 had become editor of two supplements for 'Vesty,' the Russian newspaper in Israel.   In 2000, Mozgovaya joined the Yedioth Ahronoth newspaper, covering immigration to Israel and Diaspora Jewry. She went on to report from Gaza during the disengagement in 2005, and from the Lebanese border during the war with Hezbollah in 2006.   Mozgovaya has reported from around the world, contributing in-depth articles on topics ranging from human trafficking in Eastern Europe to the AIDS epidemic in Africa; clashes with the PKK in Turkey to the post-election riots in Kenya.   She has closely followed events in the FSU over the last decade, interviewing the members of the political elite and opposition leaders, as well as iconic figures such as Mikhail Kalashnikov and the infamous 'Russian oligarchs.'   In addition to her newspaper work, Mozgovaya has anchored several television programs in Hebrew and Russian. In 2008, she co-hosted a Channel 9 series exploring the history of the State of Israel since its establishment in 1948.

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Dr. Barry Freundel, adjunct professor of Law at Georgetown University, is rabbi to the Kesher Israel Congregation, Georgetown Synagogue in Washington. He has been an adjunct instructor at Yeshiva University, a visiting lecturer at Albert Einstein College of Medicine's Jewish Students Group, a visiting faculty member at the New York institute of Technology, and an adjunct lecturer at the University of Maryland. He is currently Assistant Professor of Rabbincs at the Baltimore Hebrew University. He is the author of Contemporary Orthodox Judaism's Response to Modernity published by KTAV in 2003 as well as numerous scholarly articles. Rabbi Freundel has lectured widely on bioethics and end-of-life issues.

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In this week's East Asia Weekly Review, Victor Cha discusses the promotion of U.S.-Asia trade relations in President Obama's State of the Union Address.  This podcast is a service of the Asian Studies Program at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service

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Elliott Abrams, adjunct professor in Georgetown’s Program for Jewish Civilization, is an expert on U.S. policy in the Middle East, Israel-Palestinian affairs, democracy promotion, human rights policy, U.S. foreign policy.  Mr. Abrams served as the Senior Director for Democracy and Human Rights, Senior Director for the Near East, and Deputy National Security Adviser handling Middle East affairs in the George W. Bush administration, and as Assistant Secretary of State for UN affairs, human rights, and Latin America in the Reagan administration.

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