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Archive for June 2011

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Georgetown University proudly announces the establishment of the Master of Arts degree in Asian Studies. Housed at the only U.S. Department of Education-funded National Resource Center for East Asia in the nation's capital, the new M.A. degree gives students a unique combination of functional training and regional expertise. This degree will provide students with the necessary skills to meet the demands of advanced graduate study and the demands of global private and public sector interest in Asia. As the only graduate degree on Asia at the University's three campuses, the M.A. in Asian Studies at Georgetown is a terminal 36 credit (12 course) degree program. Students will have the opportunity to study core disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences as they relate to Asia. Students will be given the opportunity to specialize in at least one and potentially two areas of concentration. A thesis option is available.

This innovative balance of traditional area studies and functional training offers students a package of scholarly expertise and substantive skills that should enhance the intellectual value and the marketability of their degree, whether they pursue employment or a Ph.D after the M.A.

For more information, please visit http://asianstudies.georgetown.edu/academics/requirements/.

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You are listening to an audio sample from Professor Victor Cha's professional development seminar, "Sports Diplomacy in Asia." The seminar attendees were MD-DC-VA K-12 and community college educators.

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You are listening to an audio sample from Professor Christine Kim's professional development seminar, "The Two Koreas: National Division in Historical Perspective." The seminar attendees were MD-DC-VA K-12 and community college educators.

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You are listening to an audio sample from Professor Jordan Sand's professional development seminar, "How Did Japan Modernize in the 19th Century?". The seminar attendees were MD-DC-VA K-12 and community college educators.

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You are listening to an audio sample from Professor Carol Benedict's professional development seminar, "Origins of Communism in China: Boxer Rebellion to 1949." The seminar attendees were MD-DC-VA K-12 and community college educators.

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Voice of America recently covered a workshop at SFS sponsored by CCAS, PJC and the Turkish Studies programs. The seminar focused on music in the Middle East and how music can promote understanding between people of differing views. The event featured the music of Lamajamal. Check out the full story, complete with video and audio clips of the performances, at Voice of America.

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SFS Professor Christine Fair recently spoke on the Kojo Nnamdi Show about the detaining of CIA informants who helped with the capture of Osama bin Laden in Pakistan. Fair said,

So what we do know in the Pakistan Armed Forces is that there is a problem with actual terrorist radicalization, sympathy as well as facilitation of attacks. And, again, you would think that that would be a pressing issue of larger concern in the major, who may or may not have been complicit in identifying the world's greatest terrorist. But again, it really underscores that Pakistan has a different set of priorities than what American observers would like Pakistan to have.
For the full interview, go to The Kojo Nnamdi Show.

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SFS Dean Carol Lancaster was recently quoted in the Los Angeles Times about the US aid program to Afghanistan. The article covers new reports which look closely at the multi-billion dollar aid program and questions its effectiveness and the ramifications of the program after US troops pull out of Afghanistan.

Dean Lancaster said:

"There is this assumption that if we spend a lot of money on them, they'll like us," said Carol Lancaster, a former deputy administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development, who is now dean of Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service. "I'm not sure what you gain by spending a lot of money that doesn't produce sustainable and beneficial change."

To read the full article, check out the LA Times.

 

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The Levant Foundation recently announced:

The Levant Foundation is pleased to announce the establishment of the Jamal Daniel Fund for the Study of the Levant at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University.  This program will support students and scholars in their studies of the Levant Region – its culture, history, society, religion and current political context – as well as provide a platform for policymakers to discuss current and future issues as they pertain to the Levant Region.

"We welcome this opportunity to further greater understanding of the Levant Region and its impact on the greater Middle East, larger Muslim world, the Arab Gulf countries, and the world," said Georgetown University President John J. DeGioia.

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Director of the Program for Jewish Civilzation Jacques Berlinerblau wrote in The Chronicle for Higher Education Brainstorm blog:

I invite you to watch this video, which features a beautiful, live vocal performance (trust me on this) by the folk singer ellen cherry. Prior to singing for us, Ms. cherry discussed the influence of her Catholic upbringing on her art. One is always delighted to meet young musicians as articulate as they are talented.

Ms. cherry was interviewed by one of my students, Ms. Alexa West. Here at the Program for Jewish Civilization at Georgetown University, we are singularly focused on developing our students’ talents. Truth be told, not much development was needed for the gifted Ms. West, whose camera readiness we all discovered when she was producing some interviews for our work with The Washington Post.

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