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Archive for August 2011

SFS Associate Professor Abraham Newman wrote that European leaders need to figure out an adequate solution for the financial crisis through a new politics of solidarity.

The European response to the financial crisis has been halting and half-baked. Leaders from Germany and France repeatedly refused to commit to specific policies only to adopt them days or weeks later as the cost of inaction multiplied. This has undermined credibility in the European policy-making process and threatened the region's economy.

It is time for Merkel and Sarkozy to reignite the cause for Europe through a new politics of solidarity. Such a grand strategy would acknowledge European member states' collective contribution to the crisis while at the same time prepare national electorates for the necessary sacrifices to guarantee the region's long-term financial stability.   

Read Newman's piece at dw-world.de

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The Hindu American Foundation sponsored an essay contest, which prompted participants to answer: "Every day, my Hindu-ness makes me a better American because... " Sohini Sircar graduated from the STIA program this May with a concentration in Biotechnology and Global Health and a certificate in International Development. She is currently working at the National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health. Most recently, she attended and helped organize a conference hosted by Hindu American Seva Charities at the White House and at Georgetown University and hopes to continue with her work with these and other Hindu organizations. Read an excerpt from her essay here:

Essence By Sohini Sircar Many American Hindus view their lives as having two poles. They display their Hindu side at home or at the temple amongst family and their American side at school or work. This dual life–almost like split personality–can be confusing when the two areas converge. But this is not the only way to live as an American Hindu. In fact, I strongly believe that these two identities are inextricably linked in my existence as a Hindu in the United States.

Read the full essay at the Huffington Post.

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Sophomore year is a time of decision making, in selecting your major and applying for study abroad. You also need to be conscious about your major while selecting courses, since for some majors there are specific courses that should be taken during the sophomore year. Here are some guidelines.

1. Major Declaration

The major declaration period begins at the conclusion of Add-Drop in September and ends on the Friday before Spring Break. If you are applying for study abroad, your major has to be declared prior to initiating the study abroad application. The procedure of major declaration can be found at: http://bsfs.georgetown.edu/academics/majors/declaration/

Don't wait: If you already know your major, you should not wait to declare, as you can start establishing relationships with the curricular dean (the dean in charge of each major)* and the faculty mentor (if you choose to have one)**. Even if you are indecisive, don't worry about going ahead; you will not be prevented from changing your major in the future as long as there is a good academic justification and you can still graduate on time.

More information on the majors can be found at: http://bsfs.georgetown.edu/academics/majors/

You can also start thinking if you would like to pursue one of the certificates. http://bsfs.georgetown.edu/academics/certificates/ Advising for certificates is done by individual certificate programs.

*Starting with major declaration, your advising dean changes from your first-year (or transfer) dean to the curricular dean.

** Having a faculty mentor is optional; a student who chooses to have a mentor is expected to construct a meaningful relationship with the faculty member. Each major's website contains a list of faculty members who serve as mentors. The Faculty Mentor Program Agreement Form can be found at: http://bsfs.georgetown.edu/academics/majors/advising/

2. Study Abroad Application

Some of the study abroad application deadlines are during the fall semester. Identify the program and the semester for which you wish to apply and make sure you know the deadline! http://overseasstudies.georgetown.edu/

3. Major-Related Courses during Sophomore Year

The following are general recommendations. You need to contact the curricular dean for choice of courses that would match your specific study goals and study abroad plan. You can now see how important it is to declare early and start working with your curricular dean.

CULTURE AND POLITICS: If you plan to study abroad in the fall of your junior year, you should consider taking Theorizing Culture and Politics (CULP 045) in the spring of your sophomore year. All students interested in CULP must attend a CULP Information Session (see Globe for times) before meeting one-on-one with Dean Gregory.

INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS: It is ideal to take Intermediate Micro in the fall, followed by Econ Stats or Intermediate Macro in the spring especially if you may study abroad during junior year. Calculus I is a prerequisite for these courses. If you don't have Calculus I or its equivalent yet, you have to take Calculus I in the fall followed by Intermediate Micro in the spring (unless you pass the Calculus I waiver exam on 8/29/2011).

INTERNATIONAL HISTORY: Students must select an area of study around which they construct their major coursework. Students interested in the major should meet with Dean Pirrotti prior to declaring to discuss their areas of interest. All IHIS students take HIST 305 Global Perspectives (fall only). IHIS students who study abroad during junior year must take HIST 305 either as sophomores or as seniors.

INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: It is ideal to take Intermediate Micro in the fall, followed by Econ Stats in the spring especially if you may study abroad during junior year. Calculus I is a prerequisite for these courses. If you don't have Calculus I or its equivalent yet, you have to take Calculus I in the fall followed by Intermediate Micro in the spring (unless you pass the Calculus I waiver exam on 8/29/2011).

INTERNATIONAL POLITICS: You should have taken GOVT 006 by the end of the fall, and GOVT 121 by the end of the spring. You may take one of the major courses in the spring. And you should strongly consider taking IPOL 320 Quantitative Methods for International Politics, especially if you plan to study abroad in the fall of junior year. All students interested in IPOL must attend a IPOL Information Session (see Globe for times) before meeting one-on-one with Dean Kasper.

REGIONAL & COMPARATIVE STUDIES: All RCST majors must choose a specific theme to explore within their region(s) of the world. This theme becomes the basis for course selection in the major. Student pursuing Regional Studies must explain how the theme applies to countries of interest within the selected region. Comparative majors must justify the selection of regions against their selected theme.

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, & INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS: STIA majors should take STIA 305 Science & Tech in the Global Arena during the sophomore or junior years.

The Add-Drop period is 8/29/2011 (starting times according to last names) to 9/9/2011. http://registrar.georgetown.edu/

4. Career Planning

The Career Center has a useful career planning checklist for sophomores. http://careerweb.georgetown.edu/prepare/careerpreptimelines/13219.html

We look forward to seeing you back!

Mitch Kaneda, Associate Dean and Director of the Undergraduate Program (IECO and IPEC majors) Kendra Billingslea, Assistant Dean Maura Gregory, Assistant Dean (CULP major) Bryan Kasper, Assistant Dean (IPOL major) Mini Murphy, Associate Dean (STIA major) Anthony Pirrotti, Assistant Dean (IHIS major) Emily Zenick, Assistant Dean (RCST major)

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INAF-349/ENGL-258 "Philip Roth: Secular Jewish Fiction" - approved for 2nd HUMW requirement INAF-423 "Politics of International Religious Freedom"

INAF-222 "Peoples and Poltics of New Zealand"

INAF-233 "Muslims in Western Art "

INAF-489 "Levantine Arab-Jew Culture"

INAF-497 "Global Indian:Diasp/Idnt/Mgrtn"

MVST-230 "Magna Carta: Government and Politics"

Detailed course information can be found on the Registrar's website, registrar.georgetown.edu.

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Parents’ Weekend

Parents' Weekend is schedule for Friday, October 14th - Sunday, October 16th. Please visit, http://sfs.georgetown.edu/events/parentsweekend/, for more information.

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Parents’ Weekend

Parents' Weekend is schedule for Friday, October 14th - Sunday, October 16th. Please visit, http://sfs.georgetown.edu/events/parentsweekend/, for more information.

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The Office of the University Registrar is responsible for enabling students to register for courses in a timely and efficient way. All students at Georgetown should register online through MyAccess.

Continuing Undergraduate and Transfer Students - Monday, August 29th 9:30 AM: Seniors 10:30 AM: Juniors 12:30 PM: Sophomores

Undergrad First Year Students - Tuesday, August 30th First Year registration opens based on the first letter of your last name

9:30 AM: M-N; I-J 10:00 AM: C-D 10:30 AM: K-L; Y-Z 11:00 AM: A-B; Q-R 2:00 PM: S-T 2:30 PM: O-P; U-V; E-F 3:00 PM: G-H; W-X

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Welcome Back! To ensure the transfer of overseas credits: 1) Drop off course syllabi to the SFS Reception Desk for me to review.

2) Within a week, I will communicate with you via email/appt the placement of these courses toward the core/major.

3) Credits cannot be posted to the GU transcript until I receive an official transcript from abroad - but doing steps #1 and 2 above should help you determine if you need to make any changes to your fall schedule of courses before Add/Drop ends.

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Add-Drop Period

August 31st - September 9th

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Every new student at Georgetown is required to complete the Scholarly Research & Academic Integrity Tutorial as soon as possible and no later than Friday, October 7th. There will be a penalty for non-compliance. This tutorial will introduce you to the fundamentals of university research and help you avoid common pitfalls. Honor Code violations, even from ignorance, can lead to permanent notations on your academic record. Complete the tutorial before you write your first paper!

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