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Archive for December 2011

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From candid career anecdotes and advice to the technical aspects of environmental work, students learned about the many facets of working in the energy sphere during the “Exploring Careers in Energy and the Environment” panel. The Oct. 27 event, sponsored by the SFS Board of Visitors and the SFS Graduate Career Development Center, aimed to help students with an interest in energy and environmental issues to navigate this evolving sector.

Denise Furey, chair of the SFS Board of Visitors Career Committee, moderated the event while Ryan Hodum, Projects and Business Development Manager at DGA; James Koehler, Vice President of Marwood Group; Glenn T. Prickett, Chief External Affairs Officer of The Nature Conservancy; and Kevin Simpson, Senior Republican Counsel of the Energy Committee for the U.S. Senate offered their best advice. Prickett kicked things off by saying, “None of the jobs I took ever existed before I did them,” sharing thoughts on new roles within the energy sector and how to get a foot in the door.

Koehler (MALAS’07) told attendees to use their student status wisely. “There are a lot of resources at your disposal here, and not a lot of people take advantage of them,” he said. He explained that professionals are usually pretty open to talking with students, but that it is crucial that students know what they want to do before talking to people about careers.

“Have a tailored agenda. Know why you’re there and what you want to ask that person. It’s not a brainstorming session,” Koehler said. If you know what you want to do, they can help you get there, he continued.

He should know. Koehler discovered his interest in energy at Georgetown. He recalled a specific class that emphasized how energy is a transnational issue that is both public and private. He decided to write his thesis on the topic and eventually used his experience to land a job on Capitol Hill. Now he consults for a private company on what Washington is doing in regard to energy policy.

Simpson said that getting a foot in the door, then distinguishing oneself from inside an organization is better than waiting to find the perfect job. He highlighted the importance of networking and having a contingency plan, especially if working on Capitol Hill, where elections and scandals keep staffers on their toes.

Shifting the talk to specific energy issues, Hodum said, “There’s no better place to focus than China” for a broad perspective on climate change. “Every major brand name is trying to ‘green’ its product supply and it all comes back to factories in China,” he said. Koehler and Simpson said Brazil is also a hotbed of activity in the field.

“By focusing on these issues, I think it gives you a passport to work anywhere in the world at a high level,” Prickett summed up.

Jen Lennon | December 2011

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SFS staffers Sarah Gentry (CLAS), Melissa Spence (PJC), Lisa Keathley (Career Development Center) and Rosie O'Neil (IBD), take a quick break from the festivities. Faculty and staff members gathered to wrap their presents for the Adopt a Family program, where an SFS group sponsored a family's holiday.

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I'm pleased to announce that Thomas Larson, IPEC, was selected as this year’s Circumnavigators winner. The title of his research proposal is "Outrunning the Grid: Incentivizing Local Investment in Rural Electrification Projects with Revenue-Generating Utilization of Small Solar Systems".

One member of the SFS Class of 2013 will be awarded a $9000 Raymond Dinsmore Fellowship by the Circumnavigators Foundation to undertake a round-the-world research project next summer. The Circumnavigators Club Foundation states that the research project must “explore an international problem or issue and generally contribute to our understanding of world conditions.” Further, your proposed research project must necessitate travel and must pose a question that could not be answered using material that is readily available in the United States.

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Professor Michael Green discusses the strategic importance of Burma/ Myanmar to the U.S. and the key takeaways from Secretary of State Clinton's historic visit to the Southeast Asian country.

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Paul Roepe talks with the Asian Studies Department about the risk of communicable diseases in Thailand after the recent flooding which has claimed more than 600 lives. Roepe is a professor in Georgetown's Department of Chemistry, and also teaches in the Biochemistry and Cellular & Molecular Biology departments at the medical school who specializes in drug resistance to malarial parasites.

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Date

Day

Time

Tutor

Professor

Room

10-Dec

Sat

6-8pm

Galen

Diba

ICC 116

10-Dec

Sat

8-10pm

Berin

Albrecht

ICC 116

10-Dec

Sat

8-10pm

Cindy

Madigan

ICC 116

11-Dec

Sun

6-8pm

Matt

Madigan

ICC 116

11-Dec

Sun

6-8pm

Hannah

Albrecht

ICC 116

11-Dec

Sun

8-10pm

Alison

Albrecht

ICC 116

11-Dec

Sun

8-10pm

Hannah

Albrecht

ICC 116

12-Dec

Mon

6-8pm

Matt

Madigan

WGR 204

12-Dec

Mon

6-8pm

Alison

Albrecht

WGR 204

12-Dec

Mon

8-10pm

Andrew

Albrecht

WGR 204

12-Dec

Mon

8-10pm

Arun

Albrecht

WGR 204

13-Dec

Tues

6-8pm

Cindy

Madigan

WGR 202

13-Dec

Tues

6-8pm

Arun

Albrecht

WGR 202

13-Dec

Tues

8-10pm

Andrew

Albrecht

WGR 202

13-Dec

Tues

8-10pm

Berin

Albrecht

WGR 202

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The School of Foreign Service and the Mortara Center for International Studies jointly invite engaged and motivated freshmen to take part in the university’s newest research initiative. A select group of the finest students in the School of Foreign Service will have the opportunity to partner with professors as research-assistants and co-authors on complex research projects throughout their undergraduate career.

For more information on the Mortara Undergraduate Research Fellows program (MURFS), including an application for freshman: http://mortara.georgetown.edu/research/undergrad/.

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The Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Program is now accepting applications for its 2012 graduate fellowships. The Rangel Program seeks applicants who are interested in promoting positive change in the world as Foreign Service Officers for the U.S. Department of State.  The fellowship is open to undergraduate seniors and graduates who want to begin two-year master’s programs in the fall of 2012.

In March 2012, the program will select twenty Rangel Fellows who will receive up to $90,000 in benefits over two years to fund tuition, mandatory fees, and living expenses for completion of two-year master’s degrees.  These benefits include two summer internships, one on Capitol Hill and one overseas at a U.S. embassy, in additional to professional development activities and mentoring.  Awardees may use the fellowship to fund graduate studies of international affairs or a related subject such as public administration, business administration or public policy at U.S. universities.  Those who successfully complete the program will receive appointments as Foreign Service Officers upon graduation, embarking on one of the most exciting and rewarding careers.

Eligibility requirements include U.S. citizenship, plans to enter graduate school in fall 2012, and a minimum 3.2 GPA.  The program encourages the application of members of minority groups historically underrepresented in the Foreign Service and those with financial need.  The application deadline is January 20, 2012.  Additional information about the Rangel Program and specific application requirements are available at www.rangelprogram.org.

The Rangel Program is managed by the Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center at Howard University and funded by the U.S. Department of State.  It seeks to promote excellence and diversity in the U.S. Foreign Service.

Contacts:

Patricia Scroggs                                               Erica Lee

Director                                                              Program Assistant

pscroggs@howard.edu rangelprogram@howard.edu, erlee@howard.edu

202-806-4367 or 877-633-0002

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On September 29th, 2011, the Asian Studies Programthe Office of the Dean of the School of Foreign Service, and the Mortara Center for International Studies welcomed Dr. Nita Rudra, Associate Professor of International Affairs at the University of Pittsburgh, for a lecture entitled "Good for the Goose, Bad for the Flock? FDI in Developing Countries (with Special Focus on India)." Professor Victor Cha, Director of Asian Studies and D. S. Song-Korea Foundation Chair in Asian Studies and Government, delivered introductory remarks.

Speaker Bio:

Nita Rudra is an Assistant Professor of International Affairs at the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, Univeristy of Pittsburgh. Her research interests include the impact of globalization on social welfare expenditures in developing countries, the political foundations of different welfare regimes, and the causes and effects of democaracu in developing nations. Her most recent works appear in American Journal of Political Science,Studies in Comparative International DevelopmentInternational Organization, amd International Studies Quarterly. She is currently finishing a book manuscript on welfare regimes in developing countries. Dr. Rudra earned her B.A. in political science from the University of Florida, M.A. in international relations from the University of Southern Florida, M.A. in economics from the University of Southern California, and her Ph.D. in political economy and public policy from the University of Southern California.

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On November 17, 2011, the Asian Studies Program, the Office of the Dean of the School of Foreign Service, and the Mortara Center for International Studies welcomed Dr. Sumit Ganguly, Professor of Political Science at Indiana University in Bloomington, for a lecture on the Sino-Indian rivalry for influence in Asia.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Sumit Ganguly holds the Rabindranath Tagore Chair in Indian Cultures and Civilizations and is a Professor of Political Science at Indiana University in Bloomington. He has previously been on the faculty of James Madison College of Michigan State University, Hunter College of the City University of New York and the University of Texas at Austin. He has also been a Fellow and a Guest Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC and a Visiting Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford University. His research and writing, focused primarily on South Asia, has been supported by grants from the Asia Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the W. Alton Jones Foundation and the United States Institute of Peace. He serves on the editorial boards of Asian Affairs, Asian Survey, Current History, the Journal of Strategic Studies and Security Studies. He is the founding editor of both the India Review and Asian Security, two refereed journals published by Taylor and Francis, London. Professor Ganguly is the author, editor or co-editor of a dozen books on South Asia. His most recent books are Fearful Symmetry: India and Pakistan Under the Shadow of Nuclear Weapons (co-authored with Devin Hagerty) jointly published by Oxford University Press (New Delhi) and the University of Washington Press (Seattle) and More Than Words: U.S.-India Strategic Cooperation Into the Twenty-First Century (co-edited with Brian Shoup and Andrew Scobell) published by Routledge, London. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, New York and the International Institute of Strategic Studies, London. His latest book is an edited work (with Larry Diamond and Marc Plattner), The State of India's Democracy, Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007. He is currently at work on a single authored book, India Since 1980, under contract with Cambridge University Press, New York.

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