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Dr. Cecilia Van Hollen, a professor at Georgetown University, has recently published a book through Stanford University Press entitled Birth in the Age of AIDS: Women, Reproduction, and HIV/AIDS in India. In this installment of the Spotlight: Asia Podcast, Professor Van Hollen discusses her new book and extensive field research in India.

About the Book

Birth in the Age of AIDS is a vivid and poignant portrayal of the experiences of HIV-positive women in India during pregnancy, birth, and motherhood at the beginning of the 21st century. The government of India, together with global health organizations, established an important public health initiative to prevent HIV transmission from mother to child. While this program, which targets poor women attending public maternity hospitals, has improved health outcomes for infants, it has resulted in sometimes devastatingly negative consequences for poor, young mothers because these women are being tested for HIV in far greater numbers than their male spouses and are often blamed for bringing this highly stigmatized disease into the family.

Based on research conducted by the author in India, this book chronicles the experiences of women from the point of their decisions about whether to accept HIV testing, through their decisions about whether or not to continue with the birth if they test HIV-positive, their birthing experiences in hospitals, decisions and practices surrounding breast-feeding vs. bottle-feeding, and their hopes and fears for the future of their children.

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Dr. Andrew Natsios believes the Obama administration must stop the use of "small inducements" like food aid to get Pyongyang to talk and push for serious econonomic reform to save the "dying country."

CSIS report by Dr Natsios:  "North Korea: A Different Perspective"

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In this installment of the Asian Studies Program's Public Health in Asia Initiative, Dr. Noelle Selin, MIT Assistant Professor of Engineering Systems and Atmoshperic Chemistry, discussed her group's research on air pollution's effects on public health in China and beyond.

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It's been more than three decades since India passed a law granting it the authority to grant compulsory licenses over drug patents in case of a public health crisis. On March 13, India finally exercised the powers it granted itself in that law. By granting the domestic Natco Pharma the right to manufacture Bayer's Nexavar cancer-preventative drug, India took precedent setting action that is being watched closely around the world. In this Asian Studies podcast we talk to Matt Schruers, an attorney, Vice-President of Law and Policy at the Computer and Communication Industry Association, and adjunct professor here at Georgetown. Schruers teaches about intellectual property at Georgetown Law and in the Communication Culture and Technology graduate program, he unpacked the legal technicalities of what kind of rights are negotiated with a compulsory license. We also talked to J.P. Singh, a global governance and development scholar, about the history of compulsory licensing in the world and why it took India more than 30 years to order one.
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Paul Roepe talks with the Asian Studies Department about the risk of communicable diseases in Thailand after the recent flooding which has claimed more than 600 lives. Roepe is a professor in Georgetown's Department of Chemistry, and also teaches in the Biochemistry and Cellular & Molecular Biology departments at the medical school who specializes in drug resistance to malarial parasites.

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Deepa Rao, PhD, is a research assistant professor at the University of Washington and a licensed clinical psychologist. Her professional interests are in the area of global mental health and stigma reduction. Dr. Rao came to Georgetown as part of the Public Health in Asia event series to discuss her work developing individual and societal level behavioral interventions designed to improve mental health, reduce stigma, and promote the quality of life of people living with chronic illnesses in India and China.

For more information on Dr. Rao, visit the University of Washington's website for Global Health: http://globalhealth.washington.edu/faculty/deepa-rao

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Sharon Perry is a senior research scientist from the Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, Stanford University, and science fellow with the Stanford Freeman-Spogli Institute, Center for International Security & Cooperation. Dr. Perry came to Georgetown as part of the Asian Studies Program's Public Health in Asia event series to discuss her work with the DPRK TB Health Policy Project.

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Cameron Campbell is a Professor of Sociology at UCLA. In the last of the East Asia NRC's Public Health in Asia event series for the 2010-2011 academic year, Professor Campbell introduces the new publicly available population database, China Multi-Generational Panel Dataset.

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/CMGPD/index.jsp

Watch Now:

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Joanna Lewis, Assistant Professor of the Edmund Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University, discusses the environmental, economic, political, social, and health impacts of climate change in China.

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Wes Mathews, Associate Professor of the Physics Department, discusses the unfolding nuclear situation in Japan, the science behind nuclear energy and radiation, and the lessons we can draw from the failures of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant.
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